Agriculture

Wed
08
Mar

What's up at the FSA Office?

by Jeremy Leitz, Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-2148

Wed
08
Mar

Phosphorus Transport from Manure


Figure 1. Comparison of phosphorus loss from a rainfall event from fields receiving 100 lb P2O5 per acre from various fertilizer sources including beef cattle manure, poultry manure, liquid swine manure, and DAP fertilizer (figure courtsey of Haq and Mallariono, ISU).

Figure 2. Impact of fertilizer source, runoff timing, and incorporation versus surface application on phosphorus losses in runoff.

This past month has been filled with solid manure applicator trainings. We’ve had the opportunity to have Drs. Antonio Mallarino and Mazhar Haq, ISU agronomy department, present their work on phosphorus management. This presentation was extremely informative with discussions relevant to balancing fertility management and water quality challenges, why transport factors need to be considered along with soil test concentrations, and it had specific information relevant to manure application decisions and phosphorus management. A couple of which we wanted to specifically point out.

Wed
08
Mar

NRCS recommendations for improving soil health

Why would farm landowners be interested in the topic of soil health?  Managing soil health helps to increase water infiltration, water holding capacity, and nutrient availability and reduces runoff, erosion, and nutrient leaching.  Because the economic value of cropland is largely based on its ability to produce a crop, improving soil health helps to protect the long-term value of this investment.  As a landowner, do you understand soil health and what your renters do to impact (improve or decrease) soil health? What practices can you encourage to improve soil health?

NRCS recommends farmland owners ask (potential) renters these five soil health questions.

Wed
01
Mar

What's up at the FSA Office?


Jeremy Leitz

by Jeremy Leitz, Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-2148

Wed
01
Mar

Don't forget to visit the NRCS office when transferring land or changing ownership

When working with the local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office to transfer land ownership, change operators or a corporation, LLC or partnership, landowners are reminded to stop by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office, or contract payments may be in jeopardy.

“Any time there is a change in the control of the land under contract, the contract holder must complete paperwork at the NRCS office to transfer control to the new owner or operator,” said Jon Hubbert, assistant state conservationist for programs.

Landowners must complete Form NRCS-CPA-152 Conservation Program Contract Transfer Agreement within 60 days of the ownership change or land transfer. If not, NRCS will not be able to make contract payments and the contract holder may be liable for financial damages and improper payments, he said.

“Most land transfers are completed by March 1, so this paperwork needs to be completed at the NRCS office by May 1 or earlier,” Hubbert said.

Wed
01
Mar

Herbicide influence on cover crop establishment

by Sara Berges, Allamakee SWCD Project Coordinator

Cover crops have received increased interest in the last few years due to their many soil health benefits. There has also been increased utilization of herbicides with residual activity to allow them to have long-lasting impact on weed management. However, this may also interfere with the establishment and growth of cover crops. When planning cover crops for the fall, it is important to consider the weed management program that will be used.

The first question to consider is whether or not you plan to graze the cover crop or harvest it for feed. If you answer “yes” to this question, then you, by law, must follow the rotational restrictions listed on the chemical label.  However, many cover crops are not listed in the rotational restriction information. If that is the case, the rotational restriction for “other crops” must be followed.

Wed
22
Feb

Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan unveiled; First round of projects to be selected in April

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey, Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Associate Dean Dr. John Lawrence and Iowa farmer Larry Buss of Logan have announced the release of the Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan.  The full plan and additional information about pest resistance management efforts can be found at www.ProtectIowaCrops.org.

Wed
22
Feb

2017 crop market outlook and aquaculture highlighted at Research Farm Annual Meetings

Steve Johnson, Farm Management Specialist and D. Allen Pattillo, Aquaculture Specialist will speak at the annual meeting of the Northeast Iowa Agricultural Experimental Association (NEIAEA) at the ISU Northeast Research Farm near Nashua.

The program starts at 9:30 am Wednesday, March 8 with the Association’s board meeting.  From 10 a.m. to Noon will be key presentations from Steve Johnson and D. Allen Pattillo. Johnson will address “Crop Market Outlook: Strategies & Tools” for Iowa’s producers. Pattillo will discuss “Aquaculture Opportunities in Iowa”. After lunch, Ken Pecinovsky, Research Farm Superintendent, will review 2016 trial results conducted at the ISU Northeast Research Farm.

Provided free at the meeting is the 2016 Research Farm Report. CCA credits (2 CM) will also be offered complimentary. Lunch will be served by the Riverton Lucky Clovers 4-H Club. Following lunch and Pecinovsky’s presentation, the NEIAEA board of directors will meet.

Wed
08
Feb

Quality Awards distributed at Calhoun Coop Creamery Annual Meeting

The 121st annual meeting of Calhoun Coop Creamery, Lansing was held at the Vet's Club in Waukon Tuesday, January 31. A noon meal was served to all by BE Catered of Waukon.

President Dave Bahr called the meeting to order at 12:45 p.m. At the conclusion of the business meeting quality awards were handed out to the following producers:

First-place low bacteria award went to Jerry Egan of Harpers Ferry. There was a tie for second place between Nancy, Mike, Mark and Brenda Hartley of New Albin and Greg and Jenny Conway of Lansing. There were 43 other producers receiving outstanding quality awards.

First-place low somatic cell award also went to Jerry Egan of Harpers Ferry. There were 23 other producers receiving outstanding somatic cell awards with averages under 175,000 for the year.

Tue
31
Jan

Seed Treatment Course scheduled for Feb. 22

Allamakee County will host a Seed Treatment Continuing Instruction Course (CIC) for commercial pesticide applicators, Wednesday, February 22. The program will be shown at locations across Iowa through the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP).

The local attendance site is Allamakee County Extension, 218 7th Ave SE, Suite #102. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., and the course runs from 9 to 11 a.m. To register or to obtain additional information about the CIC, contact the ISU Extension and Outreach office in Allamakee County by phoning 563-568-6345.

The course will provide continuing instruction credit for commercial pesticide applicators certified in categories 4 and 10. Topics to be covered include safe handling and storage of seed treatment products and treated seed; laws and regulations; personal protective equipment; and pests, pest management, and pesticides.

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