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Wed
31
May

City of Lansing unveils Mt. Hosmer trail signage; Project designed to improve safety, usability and health benefits of Mt. Hosmer trail system


Navigating the effort to help navigate the trails ... Members of the groups that recently installed trail signage on the Mt. Hosmer trail system in Lansing include, standing left to right, Jared Nielsen and Austin Feuerhelm of Northeast Iowa Resource Conservation and Development, Maryann Baldwin of Lansing’s Parks and Recreation Board, trail volunteer Bruce Carlson, Allamakee County Economic Development and Tourism Executive Director Val Reinke and, under the sign, trail volunteer Andrew Boddicker and local resident Katie O’Regan with her dog, Lacey. The main sign pictured with the group above, posted in Veterans Memorial Park atop Mt. Hosmer, shows how hikers can navigate the network of trails and loops. Photo by Ellen Modersohn.

Putting the Mt. Hosmer trail system to educational use ... Tuesday, May 23, students on a field trip from First Lutheran School in La Crosse, WI set off to hike on the Lookout Loop, which skims the top of Mt. Hosmer in Lansing. As legend has it, the Mt. Hosmer bluff was named for a young woman visitor, Harriet Hosmer, who in 1851, disembarked from a steamboat at Lansing and won a footrace to the top. Photo by Ellen Modersohn.

Leading the way through the Mt. Hosmer trail system ... New signage along Mt. Hosmer trails includes the items pictured above that were unveiled during a Tuesday, May 23 event atop Mt. Hosmer. Those items include trail identification and mileage signs, directional signs, beginning and end points, and information about what hikers can see along the way. Photo by Ellen Modersohn.

The City of Lansing and the Lansing Park and Recreation Board announce the completion of a mapping and trail signage placement project for the trails that emanate from the Mt. Hosmer Park. The project was made possible by a 2021 grant from the Wellmark Foundation. An unveiling event was held Tuesday, May 23 at Mt. Hosmer Park to share the installation with the public.

“We are excited to share all the great work that went into this partnership to bring this new benefit to Lansing residents and visitors who enjoy the beauty of Mt. Hosmer and its trails,” said Maryann Baldwin, Lansing Parks Board Chair. “Most importantly, our community volunteers who have created these trails and collaborated with the City and Northeast Iowa RC&D (Resource Conservation & Development) to bring this project to life.”

Wed
24
May

Memorial Day activities scheduled to take place in area communities


Memorial Day - May 29, 2023

Parade Grand Marshal Loretta Roese ... Since 2008, Loretta Roese of Waukon has been leading her Arabian horse, Karabay, through the Memorial Day Parades in Waukon in a “riderless horse” symbolic honoring of all the fallen soldiers who have given their lives in service to their country. With the passing of Karabay earlier this spring, Roese will now be serving as this year’s Grand Marshal for the 2023 Memorial Day Parade scheduled for Monday, May 29 in Waukon, in honor of Karabay and their parade contributions together over the past 14 years.

A variety of Memorial Day activities are being planned for the upcoming holiday weekend, including all the traditional Memorial Day observances this year scheduled for Monday, May 29 in all of the area communities within Allamakee County. Those traditions of parades, full cemetery programs and wreath laying are being planned in honor of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in serving their country, with details of some of those celebrations being outlined below on this page in their respective highlighted boxes.

Wed
17
May

Mental Health hits home: Part Three of a five-part series offering local perspectives as May is observed as Mental Health Awareness Month

by Dwight Jones

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Discussing mental health and/or acknowledging you or someone you know may have a problem can be a difficult subject to talk about and even harder to understand. In order to try to better recognize mental health issues, The Standard is printing this five-part series throughout the month to look at the many ways mental illness affects the local community.

Part One of the five-part series told the story of a 19-year-old local college student who suffers from severe anxiety and depression that has used medication and therapy to get well. Part Two told the story of a lifelong Waukon resident who battled mental illness much of his life and unfortunately succumbed to it by taking his own life.

Wed
17
May

Hansmeier to perform at Carnegie Hall

Daryl Hansmeier ...
Daryl Hansmeier ...

Waukon native Daryl  Hansmeier has received word that he has been selected to perform at the world famous Carnegie Hall in New York City Monday evening, June 12. In an email received from Craig Arnold, president of Manhattan Concert Productions, Hansmeier has been offered a contract to perform as a  member in Carnegie’s production of the Dan Forrest work “Requiem for the Living.”

Hansmeier’s long-time friend and colleague, Dr. Jennaya J. Robison, who currently serves as director of choral activities/studies at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, will be conducting the work. The ensemble will begin rehearsals Saturday, June 10 in New York City and will rehearse through the performance time which is set for Monday evening, June 12 at 8 p.m. EST, or 7 p.m. CST.

Wed
17
May

Retirement of longtime Allamakee County Conservation Director Jim Janett closes out 34-year career of strong department growth


Brings career of 34 years to a close ... Jim Janett, longtime director of the Allamakee County Conservation Board, stands next to the welcome sign at his retirement open house held in late April at the Driftless Area Education and Visitor Center in Lansing. Janett was the original director of the Allamakee County Conservation Board since its inception in 1989, his retirement bringing to a close a career of 34 years. Photo by Julie Berg-Raymond.

The changing of the guard ... Jim Janett, original director of the Allamakee County Conservation Board since its inception in 1989, stands with new director Ross Geerdes at the retirement open house held for Janett in late April at the Driftless Area Education and Visitor Center in Lansing, marking an end to Janett’s 34-year career in that position and the transition of Geerdes from his original position of naturalist with the Allamakee County Conservation Board. “He’s a dynamic individual, and he’s going to bring a lot of energy,” Janett said of Geerdes. Photo by Julie Berg-Raymond.

by Julie Berg-Raymond

When Jim Janett retired from the Allamakee County Conservation Department last month, he left an organization of which he’d been a part almost since its inception.

While county conservation boards have existed in Iowa since 1956 - a year after the 56th General Assembly passed the “County Conservation Law,” which created a conservation-outdoor recreation program - it wasn’t until 1989 that Allamakee County was added as the state’s 99th, and last, county conservation board. The Allamakee County Conservation Board (ACCB) was established in January of that year, and Janett started working part-time for them in September.

Wed
17
May

In light of recent train derailments, Allamakee County Emergency Management explains local plan in the event of hazardous results


Plans in place, just in case ... The train derailment pictured above from June 2022 along the Mississippi River just south of Lansing is one in a recent series of derailments in the local and national news that has Allamakee County residents wondering about what local plans might be in response to such incidents. Allamakee County Emergency Management Coordinator Corey Snitker and other local and railroad authorities work to continually enhance the County’s established response plan to an incident such as this, or worse. Standard photo by Julie Berg-Raymond.

by Ellen Modersohn

Train derailments in East Palestine, OH in February and in De Soto, WI earlier this month have many Allamakee County residents wondering what would happen if there were a toxic spill or fire resulting from a rail accident here. Tracks used by Canadian Pacific (CP) run along the Mississippi River on the county’s eastern border and cross its southwestern corner at Postville.

CP merged in December 2022 with the Kansas City Southern railroad and Corey Snitker, Allamakee County Emergency Management Coordinator, expects the volume of trains along the eastern tracks in the county to double, to an average of 14 trains per day.

Wed
10
May

Mental Health hits home: Part Two of a five-part series offering local perspectives as May is observed as Mental Health Awareness Month

Matt and Shelly Howe ...
Matt and Shelly Howe ...

by Dwight Jones

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, designed to raise awareness and combat the stigma that often surrounds this medical condition. Discussing mental health and/or acknowledging you or someone you know may have a problem can be a difficult subject to talk about and even harder to understand.

In order to try to better recognize mental health issues, The Standard is running a five-part series throughout the month to look at how mental illness affects local families, law enforcement, social workers, etc.

Part One of the five-part series in last week’s edition of The Standard told the story of a 19-year-old local college student that suffers from severe anxiety and depression that has used medication and therapy to get well. Unfortunately, not all stories of those struggling with mental health have a happy ending.

Wed
10
May

Lansing premiere of “SHIFT: The RAGBRAI Documentary” is Thursday; event includes Q&A with filmmakers and local participants

Red carpet at the RAGBRAI Documentary premiere in Des Moines ...
Red carpet at the RAGBRAI Documentary premiere in Des Moines ... Pictured above are riders and organizers whose stories are featured in “SHIFT: The RAGBRAI Documentary”, along with the film’s directors, at a recent premiere of the documentary film held at the Varsity Theater in Des Moines. The local premiere of the film in Lansing is scheduled for this Thursday, May 11 at TJ Hunter’s Banquet Hall. Left to right: Director Courtney Crowder, Torie Giffin, Dayna Chandler, Ian Zahren, Andrew Boddicker, Liam Lineberry, Adam Lineberry, Director Kelsey Kremer. Not pictured: Daniel Giffin. Submitted photo.

by Julie Berg-Raymond

TJ Hunter’s Banquet Hall will host the Lansing premiere of “SHIFT: The RAGBRAI Documentary” this Thursday, May 11 at 7 p.m. The event includes a purple carpet event; drinks and complimentary movie food; a silent auction supporting 10 local non-profits, the Eastern Allamakee School District (EACS), and other organizations; and a Q&A session with the filmmakers and film participants. Tickets can be purchased at the door or online at Lansingiowa.com.

Directed by Kelsey Kremer and Courtney Crowder and starring Dayna Chandler, Torie Giffin, Daniel Giffin, Adam Lineberry, Liam Lineberry and Lansing’s own Andrew Boddicker and Ian Zahren, the film’s running time is 57 minutes.

Wed
10
May

Disaster proclamation issued for Allamakee County in response to flooding along Mississippi River

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds issued a disaster proclamation this past week for Allamakee County in response to flooding that began April 24 along the Mississippi River. The governor’s proclamation activated the Iowa Individual Assistance Grant Program (IIAGP) and the Iowa Disaster Case Management (IDCM) Program.

The Iowa Individual Assistance Grant Program (IIAGP) may provide up to $5,000 of assistance, reimbursement and/or vendor voucher, for covered items to households with income at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Households may be eligible for home or car repairs, replacement of clothing or food, and repair or replacement of personal items damaged by the flood event.

Applications can be made through the local Northeast Iowa Community Action office and must be received within 45 days from the date of the proclamation. The final day to apply for the assistance is June 12 of this year.

Wed
03
May

Mental Health hits home: Part One of a five-part series offering local perspectives as May is observed as Mental Health Awareness Month

by Dwight Jones

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, designed to raise awareness and reduce the stigma that often surrounds this horrible disease. Talking about mental health and/or acknowledging you or someone you know may have a problem is definitely more acceptable than it has been throughout history, but it is still a difficult subject to talk about and even harder to understand.

In order to try to better understand mental health and how it effects local families, The Standard is planning to run a five-part series throughout the month of May that will look at the disease from different viewpoints - from those who fought the disease and have thus far overcome it, and also tell the stories that unfortunately had tragic endings.

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