Agriculture

Wed
14
Sep

Northeast Iowans of all ages learn from renowned scientist Dr. Jill Clapperton


Dr. Jill Clapperton, along with Neil Sass, Area Agronomist for the NRCS, speaks to over 65 attendees gathered at a Soil Health Workshop at the Norman Borlaug Boyhood Farm near Cresco. A rainfall simulator demonstrated the effect of ground cover on water run-off and soil erosion. Submitted photo.

World renowned plant physiologist and soil ecologist Dr. Jill Clapperton shared knowledge and strategies to promote soil health with NE Iowa farmers, landowners, and youth over the course of three public events and a five-day trip to the region.

Dr. Clapperton, the Principal Scientist and Co-founder of Rhizoterra Inc., is a well-known researcher, lecturer and advocate of farm practices that promote soil health who has conducted research and consulted with farmers around the globe. In 2013, she was the Syngenta No-Till Innovator for Research and Education.

Wed
14
Sep

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 9/14/16

IMPACT OF FLOODING ON LIVESTOCK
Recent floods and excess water could mean changes to livestock and crops management this harvest season. Many of the effects are yet to be determined as the standing crop still grows and each field and/or farm is affected differently. It is recommended to properly assess your situation and review these guidelines in preparation for harvest and feeding of livestock.

Wed
07
Sep

What's up at the FSA Office?

by Cindy Mensen, Acting Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-2148

ATTENTION FARMERS - REMINDER:
Sept. 1: Premiums were due for 2016 MPP buy-up coverage
Sept. 27: Allamakee County Committee meeting at the USDA Service Center  9:00 am start
Dec. 16: New deadline for the 2017 MPP sign-up

Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP)

Wed
07
Sep

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 9/7/16

Brian Lang
Extension Agronomist

563-382-2949
bjlang@iastate.edu

FLOODED CROPS
The flash flooding in northeast Iowa has left many producers wondering what to do next. In many areas, the flooding of 2016 reached record levels.
 
Corn
Past experience has shown us that if flood waters got above ear height, the ears were likely ruined. That assessment was correct for the floods of 2008 and 1993, but corn was flooded near tassel stage. In those cases, ears under water were ruined, basically turning to mush within a week.

It is a different story this year. The August 24 flood occurred with most corn at early dent stage. In general, ears from these flooded fields still look to be in good condition, so far. The flood waters appeared to drop quickly, which in most cases will minimize potential problems. Here are some factors to watch.

Wed
07
Sep

Stockmanship, Cattle Handling and BQA Workshops scheduled for September 19-20

Denise Schwab, ISU Extension & Outreach Beef Specialist, 319-721-9624

Stockmanship, Cattle Handling and BQA Workshops
Three Stockmanship, Handling and BQA workshops featuring Dr. Tom Noffsinger from Nebraska, will be held in eastern Iowa September 19 & 20. The Stockmanship sessions teach cattle handling methods that improve animal movement and cattle performance by reducing the stress on livestock. Noffsinger bases his presentation on four simple principles of cattle behavior; cattle want to see you, go around you, be with other cattle, and can only process one thought at a time. He will also demonstrate low stress cattle handling methods that can be used whether gathering from the pasture or processing through corrals.

Wed
31
Aug

Support for beginning farmers

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

Kayla Koether
Food System Specialist

koether@iastate.edu
563-382-2949

SUPPORT FOR BEGINNING FARMERS
ISU Extension is increasing its support for beginning farmers. Two opportunities for farmers in northeast Iowa were recently announced.
The Northeast Iowa Beginning Farmer Network is a regional effort supporting new farmers who are adding value to their products by marketing food to local consumers, restaurants and institutions or utilizing niche markets. Beginning farmers who are managing farm produce inventory and direct-to-customer sales have a distinct set of challenges. To add to those challenges, they are often only one of a handful of farms or businesses in their communities establishing a local food market. While creating something new can be exciting, it can also be isolating.

Wed
31
Aug

What's up at the FSA Office?

by Cindy Mensen, Acting Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-2148

ATTENTION FARMERS - REMINDER:
Aug. 31: Allamakee County Committee meeting at the USDA Service Center  9:00 am start
Sept 1: Premiums are due for 2016 MPP buy-up coverage
Dec 16: New deadline for the 2017 MPP decision

Emergency Conservation Program
Adverse weather, such as the torrential rains experienced this past week, makes life challenging.  The Farm Service Agency may apply for Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) if the disaster situation calls for implementation.  ECP is a cost-share program subject to the availability of funds.  Funding is not guaranteed for ECP.  Please note that the Allamakee Co FSA has not yet applied for assistance. 

Wed
24
Aug

What's up at the FSA Office?

By Cindy Mensen, Acting Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-02148

ATTENTION FARMERS - REMINDER:
Sept 1: Premiums are due for 2016 MPP buy-up coverage
Sept 30: Deadline to complete CCC-782 for 2017 MPP-Dairy coverage

MPP-Dairy payments made for May/June period
Area dairy producers who chose MPP-Dairy coverage at the $6.00 or higher level recently received an MPP payment.  The National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported the All Milk price for May was $14.50 and for June was $14.80.  Those prices are averaged and then the feed costs for alfalfa hay, corn and soybean meal are compiled into a “Final Feed Cost” which was reported as $8.72797 for May and $9.04648 for June.  These price statistics resulted in a milk margin of $5.76277 for the two month period. 

Wed
24
Aug

Stopping the spread of Palmer amaranth

Palmer amaranth is an invasive weed that is native to the southwestern United States. Over the last three years, however, the weed has made its way into Iowa and has been identified in at least nine counties, most recently in Madison, Clayton, Washington and Crawford Counties.

Palmer amaranth is related to waterhemp, a common weed found across Iowa. In addition to traditional weedy traits, the characteristic that makes those two weeds unique, and hard to manage, is their ability to evolve resistance to herbicides, according to Bob Hartzler, professor of agronomy and extension weed specialist at Iowa State University.

“Both weeds are adapted to a production system that relies on herbicides,” said Hartzler. “Waterhemp is a relatively non-competitive weed so many farmers have learned to accept lower levels of weed control. If Palmer amaranth spreads across the state and farmers try to manage it like they do waterhemp, it will have a huge negative economic impact.”

Wed
17
Aug

Notice of termination of a farm lease must be completed by September 1

submitted by Sara Berges, Allamakee SWCD

Now is a good time to think about your farm lease for next year.  According to Iowa law, if you want to terminate your rental agreement or make changes in your current lease terms, you must properly serve a notice of termination by September 1. This applies to both cash and crop-share leases, but not custom farming contracts.  Prior to 2013, parcels under 40 acres were exempted from requiring termination notice.  Now, a written notice of termination is required on all tracts of rented farmland, regardless of size.

Farm leases automatically continue as written from year to year unless either party gives a notice of termination.  Even an oral lease is automatically renewed if it is not properly terminated.

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