Viewpoints

Wed
23
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Steve Paul

To the Editor:

August 16, I attended U.S. Representative Ashley Hinson’s town hall held at the Veterans Museum in Waukon. Hinson’s selected venue and her office’s invitation to Veterans were to give the impression that she supports Veterans. Unfortunately, Hinson’s voting record demonstrates that she actually votes against Veterans.

Examples of her voting against Veterans are the EVEST Act of 2022 and Honoring our PACT Act of 2022. Hinson cast a “no” vote to these important bills.

The EVEST Act (Ensuring Veterans’ Smooth Transition Act) automatically enrolls Veterans into the Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system when their active duty ends. This bill eliminates red tape, the waiting period for approval and any gap in Veterans having their health care needs met. Thanks to Democratic Representatives and a few Republican Representatives, EVEST Act is now law.

Wed
23
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Thomas Hill

To the Editor:

Once we have made up our minds on a contentious issue, it is difficult for us to accept evidence that contradicts our view. On no topic today is this more apparent than Donald Trump’s role in the events leading up to January 6, 2021, and his ongoing position in our political system.

He has recently been indicted by Jack Smith, U.S. Special Counsel, and Fani Willis, Fulton County District Attorney for his actions. Trump supporters dismiss these indictments as mere political acts by Democrats and refuse to consider them with unbiased eyes.

Recently, however, an unimpeachable Republican, J. Michael Luttig, has spoken out to Judy Woodruff on the PBS News Hour (August 14th, 2023) about these issues. Luttig is a retired federal judge and a leading conservative jurist.

Wed
16
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Arthur Clocksin

To the Editor:

My wife and I enjoyed seeing the production of “Rent” at Waukon’s Main Feature Theater after the Corn Days meal. The acting and the singing were great. It seems that every time Wolfpack Theater Company puts out a production, it ends up being a big hit.

My only concern is that even a great production such as “Rent” may keep some potential attenders away because of its moral content. Someone said to me after urging me to attend, “Definitely go, but you might choose not to invite your church friends.”

Perhaps a solution may be for the Wolfpack directors to see if they could obtain a high school edition of the play, which is often available, to give a more toned-down and less morally objectionable version of the play.

Meanwhile, I look forward to seeing the production of “Guys and Dolls” in November. I think that Adam Hooten and his Wolfpack team are once again working on a great upcoming show.

Wed
09
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Ann Fields

To the Editor:
What is “woke”? During the last political cycle, many politicians started to use the term “woke.” What does “woke” mean? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “woke” means “aware of and actively attentive to important societal facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice).”
Another definition of woke is: “Woke means awakened to the needs of others. To be well informed, thoughtful, compassionate, humble and kind. Eager to make the world a better place for all people.” (AudreyLovesParis)

What is bad or wrong about being “woke”? Shouldn’t we be aware of the facts and the needs of others around us - poverty, hunger, polluted water and air, educational needs, racial injustice, and inflation, to name a few.

If we can agree on these needs, then we can try to make Iowa and the United States a better place by working toward solutions for these needs. Why is being “woke” a bad thing?

Wed
09
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Marilyn Anderson

To the Editor:
A group of ladies from Zion United Church of Christ gathered with the goal of doing something good for our community. FTK, or Feed the Kids, was born. They collaborated with many people and groups to carry this project off. I see so many wonderful things from this project.
1. Gathering children for food and socializing (I heard talking; I observed no cell phones.)
2. Adults modeling service for children (Modeling what we want our children to do.)
3. Appreciative children and families (Many pleases, thank yous, and smiles!)
4. Church families taking on the task of serving for a week at a time as well as one church providing take-home breakfast for the next day (Community Collaboration!)
5. A project that was able to touch so many people in our community (Just look at the number and range of kids under age 18 this program was able to have an impact on!)

Wed
09
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Kristen A. Wonderlich

To the Editor:
“Because that’s the way we do it here” In Bon Jovi’s song, “Who says you can’t go home?”, the lyrics reflect a wandering soul who worked hard to escape his small town and whose travels have led him far away from his home. He sings of the irony in realizing that the only road he now wants to take is the road home where everyone knows him and calls him “one of their own”.

I traveled that road home as I returned home to NE Iowa for nearly three months this summer. Although the reason for my return was not what I wished, there was a great blessing in being home. As I walked the familiar streets of my hometown seeing faces I’ve known all my life, I was greeted with smiles, hugs, and the occasional question, “You’re the Wonderlich girl who’s the opera singer, aren’t you?” I was welcomed back as if no time had passed since my leaving.

Wed
02
Aug

Word for Word 8/2/23

Pastor Abraham Faugstad
Pastor Abraham Faugstad

You Matter!

When I was growing up, I remember the older generation saying, “back in my day… you could get a bottle of pop for a dime and a hamburger for a quarter!” I used to laugh when people would say things like this but now, I find myself saying the same thing! Over the past few years, it’s been astounding seeing how certain items have gone through the roof. A rusty used car goes for the price of a collector’s vehicle. While the item might not change, the price at which it is purchased changes its value. The value of something is dependent on what someone is willing to pay for it.

Wed
02
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Wendy Schutte

To the Editor:

Iowans take their responsibility of voting seriously. And, after an election, regardless of whether or not a constituent voted for an elected leader, we expect that the individual listens to all constituents.

Both Rep. Ashley Hinson and Sen. Chuck Grassley claim to hold town halls in each of the counties they represent but the visits are often nothing more than a photo op. Both fail to hold public town halls where their constituents can ask questions and voice their concerns.

Wed
02
Aug

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Lowell L. Engle

To the Editor:

The stench from Washington D.C. is growing every day and the focus of that stench is mainly, but not entirely, on the Biden White House. It is obvious from the testimony of two IRS whistle blowers last week that the Biden family and President Joe Biden are totally compromised and guilty of graft.

That testimony clearly pointed out that Hunter Biden received at least 10 million dollars from Burisma and from other sources in Eastern Europe. It also showed that President Joe Biden was a contributing factor in assuring that the extortion payments were made. It’s clear that at least ten shell companies were created by Hunter Biden and his associates to launder those funds and attempt to hide the true source. More information on this subject will be forthcoming next week.

Wed
26
Jul

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Arlen L. Wonderlich

To the Editor:

The speed limit on the Great River Road south of Lansing is 35 mph from just past the Lansing Harpers Road until you pass Columbus Road by the Driftless Area Education Center, where it changes to 45 mph. Of interest; at the intersection of Whalen Hill Road and Great River Road the visibility to the west is very limited; however, the speed limit has already been changed to 45 mph!

A short distance past the intersection with Whalen Hill Road the speed limit increases from 45 mph to 55 mph. The 55 mph is in effect from that point until you reach Harpers Ferry.

I have met with the Allamakee County Board of Supervisors asking them to consider reducing the speed limit from just past the Whalen Hill intersection to access to the Alliant Energy property, a distance of 1.8 miles. This reduction in speed from 55 mph to 45 mph would require an extra 25 seconds of driving time.

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